Ayutthaya's Ultimate Temple Ruin Hopping Bike Route

Experience Ayutthaya’s Temples by Bike

On the way to Chiang Mai from Bangkok, many travelers will stop and spend a day or two in the ancient capital Ayutthaya. Ayutthaya was the second Siamese capital for approximately 400 years until it was sacked in the Burmese–Siamese War (1765–1767). Today the temples are ruins, but the remain sparks your imagination of what these extravagant temples would have looked like in their prime.

There are over twenty temples in Ayutthaya, and you can easily see all of them in one day. The most popular ways to get from one temple to another would be by tuk-tuk or tour bus. But we recommend biking around Ayutthaya instead to take in all the temples quickly and avoid pricey alternatives.

You can rent bikes for 20-50 baht a day from hostels like Fun Dee. They will pump up your tires, provide you a lock, and set you on your way with a map. The owner Peace will even give you a little history lesson before you go!

What to Bring and Wear for Your Bike Ride in Ayutthaya

You should always have a few essentials for trips in Thailand:

  • Lots of water - Stay hydrated

  • Snacks - Stay energized

  • Sunscreen, Sunglasses, & Hat - Stay protected

  • Umbrella - Stay dry

While temple hopping, conservative temple attire is necessary. Ladies, cover your shoulders, knees, no bare midriffs. Men, wear shirts not tanks, and pants. Read our Essential Guide to Thailand for more a more detailed explanation of proper temple attire.

When to Go on Your Bike Ride around Ayutthaya

Get yourself ready and eat a substantial breakfast as early as you can so you can be exploring temples by 8AM (when they open). The sun rises so quickly that by 9-10AM it already feels sweltering.

Bike Tour around Ayutthaya

When the sun starts to feel too intense, take a snack or lunch break underneath shade with fans. You can always pop into a 7-11 for a quick blast of AC.

Brenden and I got heat stroke temple hopping in Ayutthaya so we can not emphasize hydrating BEFORE you go out. Sunscreen, hats, and sunglasses are also your best friends.

If you are up for it after your long morning, go out late in the afternoon around 4PM. The weather starts to cool down, and the large tour buses leave. You will have the ruins all to yourself and experience the sun setting over the pagodas.

When we explored after 4PM, there were no tour buses, a few tourists, but primarily locals enjoying the space. The temples are free for Thai nationals, so many were just relaxing in the shade enjoying and taking in their heritage.

Our Recommended Temple Route around Ayutthaya:

Depending on how much time you have in Ayutthaya, choose a handful of must-see temples and others that you would like to see if time permits. Ask your accommodation for a map with the temple locations and take a little time to draw your bike route. Here are the temples and bike route we recommend:

Bike Tour around Ayutthaya

1. Wat Maha That

Famous for the Buddah head in a growing Bohdi tree, this temple is the most popular tourist attraction in Ayutthaya. Get here early to beat the crowds.

2. Wat Rachaburana

Beautiful Cambodian style pagodas are still in tact. Admire all the stucco detail at this wat.

3. Wihan Phra Si Sanphet

The wihan houses the largest bronze buddha in Thailand.

3. Wat Phra Si Sanphet

Famous for the standing stupas still covered in stucco.

5. Wat Loyayasutharam

One of the largest reclining Buddhas in Ayutthaya is housed here.

6. Wat Chaiwatthanaran

Pro Tip: For those of you who drive on the right, traffic drives on the left in Thailand. Ride your bike on the left and be especially careful making a right-hand turns.

When to go on Your Bike Ride around Ayutthaya

Get yourself ready and eat a substantial breakfast as early as you can so you can be exploring temples by 8AM (when they open). The sun rises so quickly that by 9-10AM it already feels sweltering.

When the sun starts to feel too intense, take a snack or lunch break underneath shade with fans. You can always pop into a 7-11 for a quick blast of AC.

Brenden and I got heat stroke temple hopping in Ayutthaya so we can not emphasize hydrating BEFORE you go out. Sunscreen, hats, and sunglasses are also your best friends.

If you are up for it after your long morning, go out late in the afternoon around 4PM. The weather starts to cool down, and the large tour buses leave. You will have the ruins all to yourself and experience the sun setting over the pagodas.

When we explored after 4PM, there were no tour buses, a few tourists, but primarily locals enjoying the space. The temples are free for Thai nationals, so many were just relaxing in the shade enjoying and taking in their heritage.

In Conclusion

Biking around Ayutthaya is the best way to see the most ruins in one day. Even if you don't plan on going to many temples, biking, in general, is the easiest way to get around town. Traffic is not as crazy as Bangkok and bike paths are clearly marked around the park. Peddle around the ancient city, soak in the sites, and get a little exercise too!